Posts tagged "Words That Work"

Change the name and you change the fortunes

Change the name and you change the fortunes

February 13, 2019 Posted by Excerpts 0 thoughts on “Change the name and you change the fortunes”

A clear but somewhat narrow majority of Americans today support eliminating the so-called “estate tax,” and a slightly higher percentage would back the elimination of the “inheritance tax,” but more than 70 percent would abolish the “death tax”. Sure, some object that the term “death tax” is inflammatory, but think about it. What was the event that triggered its collection?

Excerpt from: Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear by Frank Luntz

Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear

Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear

January 4, 2019 Posted by 0 thoughts on “Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear”

Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear

Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear

By Frank Luntz.

Words that Work Frank Luntz

On the Power of Asking a Question Rather than just Stating a Fact

December 28, 2018 Posted by Excerpts 0 thoughts on “On the Power of Asking a Question Rather than just Stating a Fact”

If unemployment and inflation are up and confidence in the future is down, telling voters that life has gotten worse, while clearly factual, is less effective than asking voters “Are you better off today than you were four years ago?” Ronald Reagan asked Jimmy Carter and the tens of millions of debate listeners this devastating political question in their only face-to-face campaign encounter in 1980. No litany of economic data or political accusation could carry the power of a simple rhetorical question that for most Americans has an equally simple answer. “Are you better off” framed not just the debate, held only five days before the election, but the entire campaign, and it propelled Reagan from a dead even to ta nine-point victory over the incumbent Carter.

Excerpt from: Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear by Frank Luntz

Words That Work: It's Not What You Say, It's What People Hear by Frank Luntz

On the Power of Reframing to Encourage Support for New Policies

December 24, 2018 Posted by Excerpts 0 thoughts on “On the Power of Reframing to Encourage Support for New Policies”

In effect, positioning an idea doesn’t merely “frame” it so that it carries a certain meaning; it actually defines the terms of the debate itself.

For example, by almost two-to-one, Americans say we are spending too much on “welfare” (42 percent) rather than too little (23 percent). Yet an overwhelming 68 percent of American think we are spending too little on “assistance to the poor,” versus a mere 8 percent who think we’re spending too much. Think about it: What is assistance to the poor? Welfare! So while the underlying policy in question may be the same, the definition — welfare versus assistance to the poor — and positioning make all the difference in public reaction. If the context is a government program itself, the process and the public hostility is significant. But if the context is the result of that government program, the support is significant.

Excerpt from: Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear by Frank Luntz

Categories

Get the latest Gems in your inbox

* indicates required